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INFOBOX

Waiting for Michelangelo

Director:

Curt Truninger

Screenplay

Margrit Ritzman, Curt Truininger

Producers

John R. Bradshaw, Curt Truninger

Budget

 

Locations

Lucerne, Kanton, Luzern Switzerland

Language

English

Cast

Roy Dupuis, Renée Coleman, Ruth Marshall

Distributor

 

Genre

Romance

Duration

 

Release Date

1996


Waiting For Michelangelo is about a career woman, Kelly, who says she doesn't need a man in her life and who suddenly finds herself involved with two men.  Roy Dupuis plays Thomas, a Swiss art dealer and Rick Roberts plays Jonathan, an aspiring writer.  Kelly is a television journalist and she travels to Switzerland to interview some of Europe's most eligible bachelors, where she meets Thomas.  They spend a wonderful afternoon together but at dinner she puts an end to any further romance.  Back in Toronto a few days later, she is surprised when Thomas shows up.  They spend three days together and he announces that he's going to move part of his business to Toronto.  He leases a studio and then returns to Europe.  A series of miscommunications ensue and she finds herself attracted to a struggling writer, only to have Thomas reappear.  The dilemma begins.

This is a Roy character in seduction mode.  In so many of his other roles, Roy has made an art form out of the subtle seduction.  In this film his seduction is blatant and it defines his character.  Unfortunately this is all the role requires of him.  He looks great in the role; however, knowing that Roy is capable of so much more - the intensity, his ability to bring characters to life, his passion and depth - makes Waiting for Michelangelo more like a vacation for Roy.  Yes, a vacation: not too terribly strenuous and not very serious or overwhelming.  If he ever wondered what it would be like to do something so fluffy, something that required no exertion or much effort, he found it with this role.  Thank goodness he got it out of his system, and he looked darn good in the process.

As to the plot of the film, the writers missed a very important point.  The main character repeatedly says she doesn't need a man in her life but after she's become involved with two of them, her biggest dilemma is which one to choose, not the obvious fact that neither should be a viable option as well.  For someone so cynical and cold about relationships initially, she welcomes these two men into her life without so much as a moment of apprehension or distress.  I found this to be very stereotypical.

Stereotype can also be used when assessing most of the characters.  Kelly is on the career fast-track with not enough time to spend with her son and actually chastises him for cooking breakfast one morning.  Her best friend is also single but doesn't want to be and the only type of man she is able to attract is a loser.  The two suitors couldn't be more opposite from one another - Thomas is the charming European who sweeps her off her feet; Jonathan is the awkward struggling writer who is unsure of himself.  It all adds up to one very contrived and artificial film.  And I won't even begin to address all the clichéd lines in this film ("This isn't dating, this is great love." "Sometimes things happen as they were meant to." "I'm sorry, he was lonely and so was I.")

There is one redeeming quality, however, and that is the fact that Roy looks so good, he is a wonderful sight to behold.  Going into the film, if this is all you want out of it, then you'll not be disappointed.  My favorite scene is when Kelly and her best friend are watching the tape of Thomas.  The best friend exclaims very dramatically, "He is GORgeous!"  A few minutes later when the tape has run its entire length, Kelly hits the rewind button and says, "Let's watch it again."  It was very reminiscent.

Thomas' Wardrobe!

Considering that we know how much Roy hates wardrobe sessions, Waiting for Michelangelo must have presented quite a challenge. We don't think he would have been tempted to take any of these outfits home.

 

Waiting For Michelangelo is about a career woman, Kelly, who says she doesn't need a man in her life and who suddenly finds herself involved with two men.  Roy Dupuis plays Thomas, a Swiss art dealer and Rick Roberts plays Jonathan, an aspiring writer.  Kelly is a television journalist and she travels to Switzerland to interview some of Europe's most eligible bachelors, where she meets Thomas.  They spend a wonderful afternoon together but at dinner she puts an end to any further romance.  Back in Toronto a few days later, she is surprised when Thomas shows up.  They spend three days together and he announces that he's going to move part of his business to Toronto.  He leases a studio and then returns to Europe.  A series of miscommunications ensue and she finds herself attracted to a struggling writer, only to have Thomas reappear.  The dilemma begins.

This is a Roy character in seduction mode.  In so many of his other roles, Roy has made an art form out of the subtle seduction.  In this film his seduction is blatant and it defines his character.  Unfortunately this is all the role requires of him.  He looks great in the role; however, knowing that Roy is capable of so much more - the intensity, his ability to bring characters to life, his passion and depth - makes Waiting for Michelangelo more like a vacation for Roy.  Yes, a vacation: not too terribly strenuous and not very serious or overwhelming.  If he ever wondered what it would be like to do something so fluffy, something that required no exertion or much effort, he found it with this role.  Thank goodness he got it out of his system, and he looked darn good in the process.

As to the plot of the film, the writers missed a very important point.  The main character repeatedly says she doesn't need a man in her life but after she's become involved with two of them, her biggest dilemma is which one to choose, not the obvious fact that neither should be a viable option as well.  For someone so cynical and cold about relationships initially, she welcomes these two men into her life without so much as a moment of apprehension or distress.  I found this to be very stereotypical.

Stereotype can also be used when assessing most of the characters.  Kelly is on the career fast-track with not enough time to spend with her son and actually chastises him for cooking breakfast one morning.  Her best friend is also single but doesn't want to be and the only type of man she is able to attract is a loser.  The two suitors couldn't be more opposite from one another - Thomas is the charming European who sweeps her off her feet; Jonathan is the awkward struggling writer who is unsure of himself.  It all adds up to one very contrived and artificial film.  And I won't even begin to address all the clichéd lines in this film ("This isn't dating, this is great love." "Sometimes things happen as they were meant to." "I'm sorry, he was lonely and so was I.")

There is one redeeming quality, however, and that is the fact that Roy looks so good, he is a wonderful sight to behold.  Going into the film, if this is all you want out of it, then you'll not be disappointed.  My favorite scene is when Kelly and her best friend are watching the tape of Thomas.  The best friend exclaims very dramatically, "He is GORgeous!"  A few minutes later when the tape has run its entire length, Kelly hits the rewind button and says, "Let's watch it again."  It was very reminiscent.

Thomas' Wardrobe!

Considering that we know how much Roy hates wardrobe sessions, Waiting for Michelangelo must have presented quite a challenge. We don't think he would have been tempted to take any of these outfits home.

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