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INFOBOX

Cap Tourmente

Director:

Michel Langlois

Screenplay

Michel Langlois

Producers

Doris Girard, Bernadette Payeur, Marc Daigle, Yves Rivard

Budget

2.1 M

Locations

Montréal, Québec, Canada

Language

French

Cast

Andrée Lachapelle, Roy Dupuis, Elise Guilbault, Gilbert Sicotte

Distributor

Cinepix Film Properties (CFP)

Genre

Drama

Duration

115 minutes

Release Date

February 5th, 1993

 

 

 


Cap Tourmente is Roy’s second collaboration with Michel Langlois, following Sortie 234 five years earlier. The theme of troubled sexual relationships is further developed, but with the additional complication of family members.

The Four Winds seasonal hotel, managed by Jeanne O’Neil following the death of her seaman husband, is in a run-down state. Seafaring son Alex returns home out of the blue, coincidentally arriving at the same time as another unexpected visitor, former hotel employee Jean-Louis.

Jean-Louis has reached a crisis-point in his life and is trying to find himself, while Alex has got himself into trouble with drug dealers abroad, and needs to lie low. Jeanne’s heart is no longer in the business, and daughter Alfa is desperate to break out of the rut of her home life and dead-end bar job.

Driven by his destructive, childlike impulses, Alex manages to disrupt the composure of all the others, through sexual advances and generally erratic and inappropriate behaviour.  He has a short-lived enthusiasm for a joint effort to revitalise the hotel as a going concern, but his instability ensures that it’s doomed to failure. Emotions come to a head, and when Alex and Jean-Louis eventually leave, both Jeanne and Alfa have a very different perspective on the world.

The most compelling thing about this film is the contrast between the languid pace of the setting and the turmoil of the relationships going on beneath the surface. While the Four Winds is a peaceful holiday location where guests come to relax and get away from it all, the staff are embroiled in a tortuous maze of mutual, and inevitably destructive, sexual attraction, which turns out to have a very long history.

The catalyst of every traumatic scene in the film is Alex, the character that was written especially for Roy.  Even in adulthood, Alex uses his childlike charm and irresistibility to get love and attention, and seems incapable of mature action.  This has the effect of making him, at one in the same time, both irresistibly attractive and deeply irritating or even disturbing.  While you can readily forgive Roy’s other flawed characters (there are so many of them!), Alex  is a lot harder to sympathise with. But it is a wholehearted performance, and who else could you imagine making a pass at a beautiful foreigner, his sister, his mother, and an old pal so convincingly all in one film?

Articles:

Cap Tourmente - From Script to Screen

About Cap Tourmente/Ressac by Michel Langlois

 

 

 

Cap Tourmente is Roy’s second collaboration with Michel Langlois, following Sortie 234 five years earlier. The theme of troubled sexual relationships is further developed, but with the additional complication of family members.

The Four Winds seasonal hotel, managed by Jeanne O’Neil following the death of her seaman husband, is in a run-down state. Seafaring son Alex returns home out of the blue, coincidentally arriving at the same time as another unexpected visitor, former hotel employee Jean-Louis.

Jean-Louis has reached a crisis-point in his life and is trying to find himself, while Alex has got himself into trouble with drug dealers abroad, and needs to lie low. Jeanne’s heart is no longer in the business, and daughter Alfa is desperate to break out of the rut of her home life and dead-end bar job.

Driven by his destructive, childlike impulses, Alex manages to disrupt the composure of all the others, through sexual advances and generally erratic and inappropriate behaviour.  He has a short-lived enthusiasm for a joint effort to revitalise the hotel as a going concern, but his instability ensures that it’s doomed to failure. Emotions come to a head, and when Alex and Jean-Louis eventually leave, both Jeanne and Alfa have a very different perspective on the world.

The most compelling thing about this film is the contrast between the languid pace of the setting and the turmoil of the relationships going on beneath the surface. While the Four Winds is a peaceful holiday location where guests come to relax and get away from it all, the staff are embroiled in a tortuous maze of mutual, and inevitably destructive, sexual attraction, which turns out to have a very long history.

The catalyst of every traumatic scene in the film is Alex, the character that was written especially for Roy.  Even in adulthood, Alex uses his childlike charm and irresistibility to get love and attention, and seems incapable of mature action.  This has the effect of making him, at one in the same time, both irresistibly attractive and deeply irritating or even disturbing.  While you can readily forgive Roy’s other flawed characters (there are so many of them!), Alex  is a lot harder to sympathise with. But it is a wholehearted performance, and who else could you imagine making a pass at a beautiful foreigner, his sister, his mother, and an old pal so convincingly all in one film?

Articles:

Cap Tourmente - From Script to Screen

About Cap Tourmente/Ressac by Michel Langlois

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